By Ed Coghlan In the wake of the adoption of the CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain there has been a constant stream of criticism from chronic pain advocacy groups and individuals about the Guideline’s impact on patients. With that criticism has come a call for more action—in Congress and state legislatures– and…
Chronic Pain Patient Activist Wants Your Help

By Ed Coghlan

In the wake of the adoption of the CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain there has been a constant stream of criticism from chronic pain advocacy groups and individuals about the Guideline’s impact on patients.

With that criticism has come a call for more action—in Congress and state legislatures– and a growing frustration that not enough is happening fast enough.

At the National Pain Report, we receive emails, comments and phone calls from people asking, “what can I do?”

That brings us to Lana Kirby,  a retired paralegal from Indiana now living in Florida, who suffers from a neurologic condition that necessitates her to use pain medication on occasion.

When she was living in Indiana, getting treated by her neurologist and having her prescriptions filled was never a problem.

However, Lana found out when she moved to Florida finding a doctor and getting her prescription filled was indeed a problem.

“What’s going on?” she wondered.

Lana, who wound up her career working in the U.S. District Court in Indiana, solved her own problem. She drives back to Indiana every 90 days or so to see her neurologist.

“It’s an inconvenience,” she said.

She also quickly added that she knew for most people that wasn’t a solution.

So Lana decided to do something— to find out if other people are having the same problem that she is.

“I felt we should quantify the problem,” she said

So she has been promoting a survey to find out how pain patients have been impacted. (To take the survey, click here)

Over 1,000 people have filled it out in the last two weeks through promoting it on social media. (We are hoping many more National Pain Report Readers participate)

“Some of the stories that the people are sharing are heartbreaking,” she said. “Something needs to be done.”

Once the survey is tabulated, she’ll be sharing the results with the National Pain Report audience and other opinion leaders, advocacy groups and elected officials.

“I felt I had to do something,” she said.

She has.

We ask you to fill out the survey.

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Source Nationalpainreport.com

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